Home Technology Match-fixing can be solved with EdTech, says former Crystal Palace player at UEFA Fight the Fix conference
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Match-fixing can be solved with EdTech, says former Crystal Palace player at UEFA Fight the Fix conference

by uma

 

 

London, 11th November – Former Crystal Palace player Moses Swaibu has labelled education and technology as “fundamental” to combatting match-fixing at the UEFA Fight The Fix Conference this week.

EdTech has been a hot topic during this week’s session, held between the 7th and 11th of November in Nyon, Switzerland, with testimonies, Q&A’s and a face-to-face seminar focused on how education and technology can play a pivotal role in clearly defining match-fixing and steering young athletes away from bribery.

Speaking at the conference, former Crystal Palace player Moses Swaibu, Founder of MS5 Solutions, said: “Match-fixing is a serious issue within sports and one which requires dedicated efforts and programmes such as the UEFA Fight The Fix conference today. The issue of corruption exists beyond just sports and the education programmes and technologies developed to root out match-fixing will have a wider impact on tackling corruption, with solutions having the potential to be adapted for HR departments and business owners.”

“Education is a fundamental tool for tackling match-fixing, and, speaking from my personal experience, it is vital that young athletes are provided with the right support networks. Ultimately the case made for digital learning within this sector can provide vital details and clues, still maintaining integrity and the ability to remain relevant and up to date. Athletes are consuming more and more content online while a new reform amongst them can create more and more eye-opening opportunities towards prevention.”

This week’s session has also focused on identifying the early signs of corruption, detection best practices and the analytical landscape of detecting issues.

There are two additional seminars to follow, the next being held virtually between February 6th and 9th around the theme of intelligence, and the final seminar being held in Rome between the 17th and 21st of April on prosecution.

Vincent Ven, Head of Anti-Match-Fixing, UEFA, said:

“The UEFA FTF programme is a unique opportunity for professionals involved in combatting match-fixing to hone their skills and make a difference in their field of expertise. Under the guidance of leading anti-match-fixing experts, participants will master real-world tools, strategies and processes that will enable them to make a real and positive impact on the fight against match-fixing globally.”

The UEFA Fight The Fix programme provides knowledge, tools, and skills to those involved with combating match-fixing, enabling them to lead investigations and assist in prosecution proceedings.

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